General Advice

*Medications - It is a good idea to take the medications that work well for your child. Something for fever (Tylenol or Motrin), something for a stuffy nose that works well for your child, and pedialyte are all things that may not be available at your destination. For those sensitive stomachs or children with food allergies, make sure to take powder formula that your child tolerates well in multiple suitcases. Sunblock is recommended for just about all children after infancy.

*Infants - Traveling with infants is always an adventure. We suggest more stationary vacations, such as beach resorts in the winter, and mountain resorts during the summer. Relaxing vacations with easy access to your room, temperate climates, and facilities with child care services will really help to make the vacation. Europe site seeing vacations should be avoided. As always, but particularly with infants, try to keep the expected temperatures of your destination in mind. The Caribbean in the summer and Cape Cod in the winter would be bad combinations.

*Children - Young children love to explore. At this age most vacations will work well, as long as there is ample down time built into the schedule. Cruise ships can be a lot of fun as long as cousins or friends are going to be on board as well. From beach vacations to mountain hikes allow for their imaginations and energy to soar. As with infants, the younger toddler will do well to be near a resort restroom. At this age you want to continue to avoid European destinations where restrooms can be scarce, and restaurants do not necessarily cater to the toddlers.

*Adolescents - Vacations are a great time to teach teenagers. Give them a budget and have them research the trip. Allow them to research the hotels, and with a budget and supervision, have them make the reservations. Suddenly the value of a dollar becomes clear. Involve them in the itinerary planning as well. Active involvement in the planning will, with luck,keep them more interested in the vacation, avoiding the bored, dragged away from friends disposition. Family trips are also a great time to learn about other cultures, and with good planning you may come back with more that just souvenirs.

*Cruise Ships - Cruising is becoming an increasingly popular way of seeing places. Still there are some special considerations. Keep in mind that some cruise ships have age minimums, most often your child must be at least 6 months old, so check the cruise line website or ask. If you have a larger family, coordination can become difficult, so cruises that do not assign meal times may be a good bet, allowing for greater flexibility. Disney cruises have far better child specific entertainment. Going with a group will provide better entertainment for the cost involved. Sea sickness is something to be considered as well. Staying on a large boat, middle of the ship, lower level will help keep sensitive stomachs healthy. In some cases medication will need to be prescribed.

*Air Travel - Be prepared. Delays are common, and likely to get worse not better. So be prepared. Take snacks, and portable entertainment. This is a great time to read a story to your children. It will pass the time both for you and for your kids. For those with older children, this is a great time to talk, really talk. It allows for the conversations that get lost while we are all rushing around. Although some folks want to sedate their children with antihistamines for longer flights, be aware that some children actually do worse with medication, as they get hyper alert, or have an interrupted sleeping cycle. So please use caution.

*CDC Alerts Check this link for the latest CDC alerts before you travel..